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Assuming the multiverse theory is true, then each universe has a different set of constants and it provides a reasonable explanation as to why the constants in our universe seem set 'just right' for life (the antropic principle). All good so far. But regardless of other universes, I'd like to talk about my bathroom.

As far as we can tell the constants in our universe are the same wherever we look. The speed of light is the same speed in my bathroom, as it is in the billions of galaxies of space, along with 30 or so other constants that make our universe uniquely 'ours'.

So, assuming these constants can change (or not, other universes with different constants do not concern my bathroom), where are these 'dials' set exactly? Humor me for a moment, I have a serious point. We can assume this happens at the Big Bang, or sometime after inflation, but regardless of the last 14 billion years it took to create my towel rail and the andromeda galaxy, it means that every pixel of our universe 'understands'or 'knows' what the constants of our universe are. In whichever direction look, for billions of years. It's as if every 'cell' of space has a little bit of cosmic DNA. Or is it perhaps that there is a central control room with all the levers set to 'just right'? How can the millions of neutrinos passing through my bathroom 'know' that the rules are the same there as they are in the bedroom?

This seems to be a fundamental question that no one seems to be seriously trying to ask or understand?! How are these flexible 'rules' locked in across billions of light years of space, and my bathroom? And the same problem arise in the universe next door, where are the rules 'set' for those constants in other universes? How does a particle 'know' how to behave? Where are the speed limit signs written? What is it about empty 'space' that can have so much information 'dialed' into it?

When you ask this question. Regardless of the multiverse and the other universes with different constants, it simply suggests that every part of each universe is connected to, for want of a better description, a central control room. With those rules being communicated to every pixel of our universe from that centralised rule book. Alternatively every pixel of our space carries a cosmic DNA, telling it how to behave. One of these ridiculous answers must be true. The laws of our physics are literally written into every corner of our universe, but if the laws can be changed (or not) where is the constitution held for everyone to read?

That in itself is quite profound question to ponder....

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    $\begingroup$ At the start you seem happy with the anthropic principle, then you seem to ignore it, in asking how are constants commuicated? If the anthropic principle says this universe is just right, then where ever we are in this universe will also be just right too. Why is there a need for communication if the big bang did not happen at a single spot? Everywhere, apart from black holes and near stars should be OK to live in, given earth like conditions. $\endgroup$ – user108787 Nov 21 '16 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for taking the time to respond, however I couldn't have been clear at all. Forget the anthropic principle, that must have been a distraction. $\endgroup$ – Bizint Nov 21 '16 at 21:13
  • $\begingroup$ A chemical reaction happens in the same way in my bathroom, as in another galaxy, but perhaps not the same as in another universe. So how does my bathroom, and the things in it, know what universe it is in? $\endgroup$ – Bizint Nov 21 '16 at 21:33
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, disclaimer first: I am not a fan of the antropic princple, (because it's a cop out regarding predictions, imo) nor am I very well experienced in any aspect of physics. I self study.....Your bathroom knows nothing about anything. It does not have to. This universe is defined by the physical constants it uses in its rules, agreed? The question of other possible universes and also if a human observer is needed in this one are open ones, without proof either way. You might be trying to make a point I am too stupid to follow, I am sorry about that :) $\endgroup$ – user108787 Nov 21 '16 at 21:48
  • $\begingroup$ "regardless of other universes, I'd like to talk about my bathroom." +1 for this bold opening. $\endgroup$ – Steeven Nov 28 '16 at 18:44
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The fact that universal laws exist, in a universe this big and partly disconnected, suggest that these laws are not created or distributed from anywhere, but that the laws just hold everywhere because they are somehow logically inevitable. Humanity is only in the process of finding out this 'logic', which will presumably include explanations for all the known natural constants. I think most scientists basically share this belief.

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You are confused. The physical constants just are; there is no need to "communicate", "control", or "transmit" them. In order to avoid an infinite regress, any physical theory system requires axioms, and constants that are not amenable to further reduction. They are the "stuff that reality is made of". Of course, my previous sentence involves a bit of a sleight-of-hand: We cannot know anything about the "real stuff" that reality is made of, so I should have said that these things are the stuff that our models of reality are made of. It goes without saying that all we ever have are models of reality, as has been clear at least since Kant.

As an aside, the idea of multiverses is plain nonsense, epistemologically speaking, and the "anthropic principle" is nothing but a banal tautology, which needs no "explanation".

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"pilot waves" in google might bring you some clarity as to how particle "knows" how to behave. at least it can be understood in those terms

Its all about energy transfer, conservation laws kinda make sense for all the particles and perhaps for all the universes possible. Otherwise universe would be too unpredictable and annoying, cuz your towel would keep mutating into all kind of things every single moment. And especially annoying is when the towel in your bathroom goes supernova. Anyway such a universe would bigbang itself untill it is stable enough. That would be fine tuning: not the only way to be, but the only way to be someone's home.

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    $\begingroup$ I feel like pilot waves have very little to do with OP's question though $\endgroup$ – AccidentalFourierTransform Nov 28 '16 at 17:46

protected by Qmechanic Nov 29 '16 at 20:00

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