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On coming to the point that 64 g of copper block contains $6.023×10^{23} $ (avogadro number) of atoms and assuming that from each atom one free electron is taken into consideration, is it possible to accumulate all $6.023×10^{23} $ electrons towards one side of the metal, either by applying high potential or by some other means. Maximum of how many electrons can be accumulated? If this is not possible with copper, let me know with which substance this could be established.

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  • $\begingroup$ Like in a Hall effect measurement? The answer is 'not many electrons'. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Nov 20 '16 at 16:54
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    $\begingroup$ $6 \times 10^{23}$ electrons is about 100,000 Coulombs. That's an enormously large value. There are many reasons why it is practically impossible to do this, perhaps even theoretically impossible if you insist that the metal contain one mole of material. $\endgroup$ – garyp Nov 21 '16 at 15:23
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They can be concentrated at the centre by bringing a positive charge near it, as it applies a force on the electrons symmetrically towards the center.And as a result a positive charge is created at the edges.

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Electrons can be accumulated to one side of a metal using something like a capacitor. It's two pieces of metal with some type of insulator between them. But technically this wouldn't accumulate the electrons it would make the electron orbitals more elliptical. And the nucleus would not be in the center of this ellipse, it would be nearer to the negatively charged side of the capacitor. But I don't think you can permanently separate the valence electrons from the copper atoms

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