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In a nuclear fission reaction, do the fission fragments interact with each other or with other product neutrons and gammas? if the answer is yes then how could we determine the probability of this interactions and what are the conditions for this interactions?

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This is an attempt at a short answer to the above post, that I more than welcome a critique of, in the hope of learning more about its almost certainly simplistic assumptions.

In a nuclear fission reaction, do the fission fragments interact with each other or with other product neutrons and gammas?

Why would they not interact in all manner of ways? It's initially a small, highly energetic region, more akin to the LHC than a normal commercial, controllable "slow" nuclear fission reactor. Unfortunately I cannot tell you, (because I simply can't find) the percentages of different types or reactions between the various byproducts of the reaction.

If the answer is yes then what are the conditions for this interactions?

The conditions for these interactions is basically, it's conversion of mass to energy, even on a relatively inefficient basis, in particle creation terms (as most fission bombs are) but with still enough particles created to give a supercomputer a good workout.

From: Nuclear Weapon Yield

A standard bomb's energy distribution, in the "moderate" kiloton range, near sea level.

Blast 50%,

Thermal energy 35%,

Initial ionizing radiation 5%

Residual fallout radiation 10%

Please don't forget the vital role of computer modelling of such explosions, since the advent of various nuclear test ban treaties.

How could we determine the probability of this interactions

In the same way as we work out the probability of any reactions of this type, by calculating scattering amplitudes, decay rates, branching ratios and detection of the longer lived particles. The problem is that the number of reactions involved are rather large and will contain a high percentage of possibly erroneous simplifications. Even then, I would imagine the reduced amount (both in number and complexity) of calculations would still occupy a lot of computer processing time and resources.

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