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Possible Duplicate:
About binary stars and calculating velocity, period and radius of their orbit

I am given the non-redshifted wavelength of the EM radiation from one of the stars, the wavelengths at minimum and maximum redshift, and the interval between minimum and maximum redshift (which is presumably half the orbital period). It is assumed that the stars' orbits are on the same plane as the Earth.

How would one calculate the radius of the given star's orbit?

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marked as duplicate by Qmechanic Dec 30 '12 at 21:46

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    $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/22700/520. Might even be a duplicate, but if it is there is a dire need for a better answer than my off-the-cuff hand-waving. $\endgroup$ – dmckee May 24 '12 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ I looked at that, it didn't get me any closer to knowing what to do. Besides, from what I can see, all that's needed is a simplified model that takes no account of the velocity of the Earth. $\endgroup$ – tzxn3 May 24 '12 at 21:41
  • $\begingroup$ "from what I can see, all that's needed is a simplified model that takes no account of the velocity of the Earth" First bullet point: subtract off the known contribution from Earth's orbital motion. $\endgroup$ – dmckee May 24 '12 at 22:41
  • $\begingroup$ "Remove the mean relative velocity, and find longitudinal velocity in the remote system center of mass frame as a function of time. You can also get the longitudinal size of the orbit by integrating the velocity. Compute the reduced mass and reduced radius of the orbit from Kepler's laws" I don't really understand any of this part, though. It goes far beyond what I really need to know for this course, so my current knowledge is insufficient. $\endgroup$ – tzxn3 May 25 '12 at 11:15