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What exactly is fire, why isn't it defined by the three states of matter, and does it have mass, weight?

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Is fire plasma? $\endgroup$
    – M. Enns
    Oct 22 '16 at 18:38
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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of physics.stackexchange.com/q/9708 $\endgroup$
    – user108787
    Oct 22 '16 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ Fire is not a state of matter, it is what you see during a combustion process. (BTW there are four states of matter). $\endgroup$
    – Charlie
    Oct 22 '16 at 18:47
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Quite a vague question, and I'm not sure its appropriate for the site. But, very simply, fire is glowing gases.

Gases have mass as they are made up of atoms, but the photons (the light and heat) that are radiated don't have mass.

Think about an analogy to a filament lightbulb. The heated metal which is emitting has mass, but the photons being emitted, for the purposes of this discussion, have no mass, just energy.

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