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For electromagnetic radiation one usually distinguishes between near and far field. The wave equation for the far field are based on Maxwell equations for the vacuum and predict that the radiated power density falls of with an inverse square law. From what I know, the near field is described by the inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave equation and predicts that the radiated power density falls of with an inverse cube law. Can one also distinguish in the same manner between near and far field of gravitational radiation?

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  • $\begingroup$ This is an interesting question. Off the top of my head, I would say that near enough to the source of gravitational radiation, the linear, weak-field approximation is no longer a good approximation in contrast with the EM equations which are linear. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Oct 16 '16 at 21:10
  • $\begingroup$ This might be helpful. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Oct 17 '16 at 0:20

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