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what is the difference between conventional current and electronic current?

How are they linked to one another?

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  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/17109/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Oct 13 '16 at 8:39
  • $\begingroup$ I have never heard the phrase "electronic current". You link mentions "electronic flow", which makes sense since anything can flow. While anything could flow, conventional current is chosen to be one specific thing flowing, namely positive charges. $\endgroup$ – Steeven Jan 6 '17 at 14:43
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The conventional current is defined as charge per unit time transported in a certain direction. The current direction is the direction of positive charge movement. A positive current is also negative charge per unit time moving in opposite direction to the corresponding positive charge. In conventional current, the type of charge carrier is irrelevant. It can also be produced by positive and negative charge carriers at the same time moving in opposite directions like currents in electrolytes or ionized gases. Electronic current is current produced by the movement of negatively charged electrons. This is usually the case in metals. When electrons produce a positive current in a certain direction, this means they are actually moving in the opposite direction.

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• Electric current can be either positive or negative, but conventional current is always positive. • The conventional current for an electron flow is positive, whereas the electrical current is . • For a flow of positive charges, both the electric current and the conventional current are the same. • Since almost every electrical circuit uses an electron flow, it can be safely stated that the conventional current = – electrical current. • In conventional current, the flow of electrons is assumed as a flow of protons on the opposite direction.

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In conventional current, electrons flow from positive to negative terminal whereas In electric current, current flows from negative to positive terminal of a battery

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Conventional current_ Current flow from positive to negative termminal of a body due to flow of positive charge known sa conventional current.

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Electric current can be either positive or negative while conventional current is always positive.

Current flows from negative to positive terminal in electric current while current flows from positive to negative terminal in conventional current.

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The reason 'conventional' current terminology exists is merely because Benjamin Franklin initially assumed the 'electrical particles' (i.e. electrons) were positive, so his nomenclature was established 'by convention'. That's it.

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  • $\begingroup$ This answer is true but it does not address the question - "How are they linked to one another?" $\endgroup$ – lux Jan 14 at 6:19

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