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When say a gas stove is ignited, there is only a moment of flame, however, the gas will begin to burn. The gas continues to burn even after the initial flame is gone, so my question is how does the subsequent gas also combust despite the lack of fire? Wouldn't it just begin to leak gas because there is no more fire to combust it?

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    $\begingroup$ I think that this is more a chemistry question? Above a certain temperature gas and oxygen react and produce heat, that heat then increases the temperature of the incoming gas and air mixture, which react and produce heat, . . . and so it goes on. $\endgroup$ – Farcher Oct 1 '16 at 10:06
  • $\begingroup$ ah yes thank you, and woops... (But i couldn't really find a chemistry Q&A site on StackExchange, atleast not yet ) $\endgroup$ – John Hon Oct 1 '16 at 10:09
  • $\begingroup$ By initial flame do you mean, initial spark? If that, then as @Farcher says combustion in this case is a self sustaining process, so only needs a start in the beginning. $\endgroup$ – Deep Oct 1 '16 at 10:09
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnHon Not that I want you to leave this site :-) chemistry.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$ – Farcher Oct 1 '16 at 10:23
  • $\begingroup$ The "initial flame" you refer to provides the activation energy; the reaction becomes then self-sustained. $\endgroup$ – valerio Oct 1 '16 at 10:30
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You don't need a 'flame' to light a fire. You need a fuel, oxygen and heat. Since the oxygen supply is constant, that leaves fuel and heat. The constant stream of gas allows the gas that is already on fire to heat the new gas, which continues as long as the gas is kept on.

I think your confusion stems from your misunderstanding of how combustion works. A 'flame' is simply the visual result of a chemical reaction. It is not one of the components needed for combustion

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