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Would someone be able to explain this phenomena to me.

Smoke out of a cigarette is blown into a medium size water bottle (made of glass, with still a little bit of water in it, technically wet). However, without cap, the smoke wouldn't come out (expected behaviour in my case). I flipped the bottle up side down and smoke comes out of it.

Why is this happening?I thought gaseous/vapour element would tend to move upwards.

I feel like it's nothing to do with condensation but I might be wrong.

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Smoke consists of small mostly-carbon particles of sub-µm size, but these particles are still large enough to contain many atoms. Therefore the effective particle weight is much higher than that of air and smoke will tend to accumulate under lighter air instead of rising.

Smoke only rises if it is sufficiently warmer than the surrouding air.

Whether there is water is probably irrelevant, it might however improve cooling of the smoke. Also some of the smoke will resolve in the water.

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Cigarette smoke is made up of about 5% particulate matter which is denser than air.

This particulate matter is one of the reasons one should avoid "passive smoking" as, allegedly, it is more dangerous than the particles produced by diesel exhausts

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