0
$\begingroup$

When an impulsive force is acted upon a rigid body, (and the force doesn't pass through the centre of mass) why does the body rotates specifically about an axis passing through centre of mass ?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Because the impact away from the center of mass produces a torque relative to the center of mass and this torque produces an angular acceleration according to the moment of inertia of the body corresponding to the revolution axis going through the center of gravity and vertical to the plane defined by the force (impact) direction and the line connecting the impact point and the center of mass. A free floating rotating body always rotates around an axis going through its center of mass.

$\endgroup$