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When I move a magnet over a current carrying conductor, I create an electric field. That electric field in turn produces a magnetic field. But when I stop moving the magnet the process stops. All the fields die, but with other sources, like a radio station, a laser light, a burning candle. Those fields go long after the radio station turns off its power, the laser is turn off, or the candle is put out. The fields they produced continue on at the speed of light, nonetheless. What causes one to die and the other to go on?

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  • $\begingroup$ But with EM radiation the process goes on and moves away at the speed of light. Do you mean as with the sun , stars etc.. $\endgroup$ – user108787 Sep 10 '16 at 19:25
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate / related physics.stackexchange.com/questions/4637/… $\endgroup$ – user108787 Sep 10 '16 at 19:37
  • $\begingroup$ I mean all the EM, radio waves, laser light, a burning candle. Those fields go long after the radio station turns off its power, the laser is turn off, or the candle is put out. The fields they produced continue on. $\endgroup$ – Lambda Sep 10 '16 at 19:46
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Well, I am answering my own question. Turns out when I move the magnet I am sending out EM waves. But they are very weak, extremely long waves. Thanks to Mark Eichenlaub for his response to a similar post that gave me this answer and other info as well. I know it's a weak very long wave, but still it's incredible that with only a flick of a wrist you can set into motion something that could traverse the universe.

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