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Consider the hypothetical situation, where, for some absurd reason, our part of the universe has a very different rate of acceleration compared to some other part far away. Assuming both have an almost same density of matter, will we observe any radiation from this part, which is absent in our part? To put it simply, will we observe a non-uniform distribution of radiant frequencies over the entire sky?

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  • $\begingroup$ different rate of acceleration relative to what? $\endgroup$
    – ACuriousMind
    Commented Sep 8, 2016 at 13:59
  • $\begingroup$ i dont quite know that. in the same way as we measure the rate of expansion of our universe. we measure a rate for our half, and some other earth suppose in the other half measures the rate there, and we compare. $\endgroup$
    – Lelouch
    Commented Sep 8, 2016 at 14:40

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There is a hypothetical Unruh-radiation, it is essentially the gravity-less analogue of the Hawking-radiation.

The reason that it is hyptothetical, that - similarly to the Hawking-radiation - it is many order below any measurement precision we have.

The cosmical microwave background is the same from every direction until 4 digits, as the WMAP satellite measured it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the link. I'll study that in detail tomorrow to see whether my question is answered. The introduction is really imteresting. $\endgroup$
    – Lelouch
    Commented Sep 8, 2016 at 17:55

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