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My question stems from a design I am making using microwaves, a CRT, as well as dielectric mirrors. The apparatus would be like an huge atom with no nucleus to show how if the electron has enough energy to put into a circular path (orbit around the foci{aka the "nucleus"}) and then have it speed it to the point it can release the desired photon needed to transmit certain signals on high frequencies, and lower ones as well. A gradually changing magnetic field will be need to hold the electron in orbit around the foci. Can such an apparatus be conceived, and still hold true to the laws of physics assuming that the technology already exists?

Assuming that the rectangle is a perfect square, and the oval a perfect circle, and the square a perfect diamond. The lines are secant; however using Compton scattering the lines would be tangent since the secant lines; assuming the photon loses enough early in momentum to be absorbed by the dielectric material, and not be reflected.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why would the electron go in a circular path? What force will act as centripetal force? And what is the point of mentioning the photon in this? $\endgroup$
    – nasu
    Commented Sep 3, 2016 at 15:49
  • $\begingroup$ @nasu Since a photon is a self propagating electric, and magnetic field, I was thinking that the photon would exert some type of force on the electron. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 3, 2016 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ If there is a need to edit the post tell me, if my blurb above needs to be part of the question please, tell me. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 14, 2016 at 20:55
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    $\begingroup$ All the bounties in the world won't get good answers if the question isn't clear! As presently written I don't understand the second sentence because it refers to "the dielectric mirrors" but there are no dielectric mirrors described prior to that sentence. There are also multiple spelling mistakes, and no diagram of the intended apparatus. Perhaps worse than all of that, after reading the first paragraph, the reader finds a gigantic banner saying "Better Question", which makes me wonder why I bothered to read the first paragraph. Address these issues and you will get more responses. $\endgroup$
    – DanielSank
    Commented Sep 15, 2016 at 15:19
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    $\begingroup$ Dear Sigma6RPU, your question does not make any sense! If you have a figure in mind, append it to the question. I cannot think of any other suggestions, as the question is just too vague at this point. $\endgroup$
    – jarm
    Commented Sep 19, 2016 at 19:27

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I don't know if I well understood the question, so please comment if that's the case.

If there is no external force applied to the electron, there is no reason for it to follow a circular path. It would go straight on the same direction you'd sent it.

If interaction occurred between electron and the EM field, i.e. the photon, then it would be a matter of time to the electron absorb the photon and increase its energy.

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  • $\begingroup$ Compton Scattering for example if I were to increase the number of photons entering the Dielectric circle, and have them hit tangentially the electron in a circle, can such a thing be conceived. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 13, 2016 at 1:40
  • $\begingroup$ Basically energy snowball using Compton scattering as an example by using low energy photons to force the electron to go around in a circular path producing the desired EM Wave you either X-ray or Gamma. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 13, 2016 at 1:41
  • $\begingroup$ My question stems from a design I am making using microwaves, and a CRT to show how if the electron has enough energy to put into a circular path (orbit around the foci) and then have it speed it to the point it can release the desired photon needed to transmit certain signals on high frequencies, and lower ones as well. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 13, 2016 at 1:43
  • $\begingroup$ Please comment if you want me to retract an erroneously statements, because down votes will not teach me anything. $\endgroup$
    – Sigma6RPU
    Commented Sep 13, 2016 at 1:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Sigma6RPU So if I understood well, you want an electron to make a circular path by constantly changing its momentum by hitting it with photons, right? That it theoretically possible. I have much doubts that it could be technically accomplished. First, the statement "hit tangentially the electron" with a photon does not make much sense. Photon do not have a dimension, you should regard photons as fields. The math you need to make for this case is to calculate the amount of momentum each photon can transfer to the electron. Then, understand how much momentum do you need to transfer to the... $\endgroup$
    – cinico
    Commented Sep 13, 2016 at 18:35

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