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I am new here and also physics.

i tried to understand the experiment more. In the following youtube video. the demonstration indicated that an entangled photon arrived at D0 while its partner arrived at, lets say D2 or D3 later on. I dont know why an already entangled single photon can leave interference data on D0. Isn't A PAIR of it can be form interference wave? I think i missing some very basic physic knowledge.

delayed choice experiment start by 6:54

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The same way a single photon in the original double slit experiment does, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment

The wave interferes with itself. A photon is just the interactable component of the wave.

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  • $\begingroup$ researchgate.net/publication/… but i saw the link and it said "Two correlated photons, coming from the same well-defined cross-sectional element of a source of correlated photons, that can be registered as coming from that same area, cannot self-interfere." Is it violate the idea of entangled photon can self interfere? $\endgroup$ – monique Yeung Sep 22 '16 at 13:12
  • $\begingroup$ The entangled pairs don't interfere with each other, they interfere with themselves. It's like taking the original experiment and splitting the wave into two complimentary versions. The waves still interfere with themselves but not with each other because they now have different properties (opposite in fact) and only waves that are coherent interfere. $\endgroup$ – Yogi DMT Sep 22 '16 at 14:19
  • $\begingroup$ "Interference usually refers to the interaction of waves that are correlated or coherent with each other, either because they come from the same source or because they have the same or nearly the same frequency" (wikipedia) Are the entangled pairs interfering themselves different from the basic understanding of interference ? $\endgroup$ – monique Yeung Sep 27 '16 at 4:51

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