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uniform motion means equal distance in equal intervals of time. Suppose, a particle travels on a straight line with constant acceleration, than can we say, in this case, uniform motion can be equal displacement in equal intervals of time instead of equal distance in equal intervals of time?

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Uniformly accelerating motion refers to a state of motion that accelerates at a constant rate in a single direction. Gravity is an example of uniform acceleration; an object in free fall accelerates at a constant 9.8 meters per second per second towards the center of the gravitational field.

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Uniform motion describes the situation that occurs when an object travels in a straight line in uniform motion, the distance it has traveled can be calculated by multiplying the velocity by the time it took to travel the distance. Any object that moves with deviations in its speed or direction is said to be undergoing non-uniform motion.

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They are not the same concept.

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  • $\begingroup$ so basically i can replace distance with displacement in the definition, if the particle is traveling on a straight line? $\endgroup$
    – 2022
    Aug 28, 2016 at 16:55
  • $\begingroup$ Distance is when your dog runs in a mad dash all around the garden, around every single thing there and then stops at a tree 10 metres from the house and waits for you there. Displacement is just the straight line distance you have to go to the tree , 10 metres, to get him. So your dog has run a distance of 25 metres, you have undergone a displacement of 10 metres. But don't forget, if you go 5 metres to your left, and turn around and go back 5 metres to your start point your displacement is zero, but your distance is 10. Look at the graph axis in the both definitions. $\endgroup$
    – user108787
    Aug 28, 2016 at 17:10

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