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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_foam says that,

"In quantum mechanics, and in particular in quantum field theory, Heisenberg uncertainty principle allows energy to briefly decay into particles and antiparticles which then annihilate back to energy without violating physical conservation laws."

I used to think that particle pairs keeping coming in and out of existence, I never understood it very rigorously, but I had an idea that borrowed energy of the space had something to do with it, but this is very different, it says energy itself decays into particles... I used to think energy can't exist independently to begin with, like it has to have a carrier, let alone decaying itself into particles... Can anyone explain this to me?

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We normally don't use the term "energy decay." Pair creation and annilation is the accepted term. It can be real meaning that the created particles persist or virtual meaning that the particles annihilate shortly after creation. For real pair creation the energy is taken from some other entity while the energy for virtual creation is "borrowed" from the vacuum and must be repaid promptly.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, this makes it clear. So energy can't exist independently of any carrier, can it? $\endgroup$ – Satyajit Sen Aug 19 '16 at 13:17
  • $\begingroup$ Dark energy may be the exception $\endgroup$ – Lewis Miller Aug 20 '16 at 22:59
  • $\begingroup$ Of course, since it's not really "energy" in the conventional sense. $\endgroup$ – Satyajit Sen Aug 25 '16 at 8:05

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