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I was questioning myself this month how to prove/disprove the general, specific, special Relativity law concerning the relation between gravity and time distortion. Then I saw on the web this question above coming up a couple years ago on this site but could not answer it anymore (discussion was closed with no clear answer). I think that using the new ultracentrifuges (2 millions Gs), it can be done. Putting a solution of Iodine 135 isotope in the centrifuge (half life 6,59 hours) and a reference Iodine 135 sample for the same origin outside the centrifuge and spinning it for one week, there should be a very significant difference. As you can see I am not a Physicist and not following all your discussions, I am a genome scientist working a lot in early years with ultracentrifugation for DNA isolation and now retired and interested in the relation between time and gravity.

The question here is a simple experiment where the decay of Iodine 135 that has been spun for one week at 2 millions Gs is compared to the decay of a reference sample that has been left on the table. My intuition is that there will be a difference between the two samples. It is a simple experiment (may not be at 2 millions Gs) with a simple measurement. Any one interested in doing it?

The possibility of slowing time artificially will have many applications.

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marked as duplicate by heather, CuriousOne, John Rennie gravity Aug 2 '16 at 5:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ How much of a difference did you calculate? $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Aug 2 '16 at 0:10
  • $\begingroup$ Please can you provide a reference for the web page or PSE question which you are referring to? $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Aug 2 '16 at 0:23
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Physics.SE! I suggest the following: 1) As you receive help, try to give it too, by answering questions in your area of expertise. 2) Take the tour! 3) When you see good questions and answers, vote them up by clicking the gray triangles, because the credibility of the system is based on the reputation gained by users sharing their knowledge. 4) If you get a satisfactory answer, remember to accept it by clicking on the green checkmark. $\endgroup$ – heather Aug 2 '16 at 0:41
  • $\begingroup$ @user125146: please provide a reference for the physics.SE question you are referring to. Also, please provide your calculations for reference. Otherwise, it is impossible to answer your question. $\endgroup$ – heather Aug 2 '16 at 1:18
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    $\begingroup$ Also possible duplicate of Circular motion and time dilation, and (most of all - I noticed this too late) Can a ultracentrifuge be used to test general relativity?. $\endgroup$ – heather Aug 2 '16 at 1:31