1
$\begingroup$

I am guessing the answer to this question is no, or we would have already done it.

enter image description here

My question is based on my (almost complete, sorry) ignorance of whether the mass of the earth would absorb gravitional wave energy, which I presume it would, or would there be a chance that during this absorption, that the Earth would distort and effectively amplify the effect?

EDIT Just in case the comments below disappear, my thanks to Lawrence B. Crowell for pointing out:

The LIGO detectors have a scale on the order of the wavelengths of gravitational. They are placed much further apart. It requires two LIGO detectors to triangulate the position of the source in the sky. 

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ The LIGO detectors have a scale on the order of the wavelengths of gravitational. They are placed much further apart. It requires two LIGO detectors to triangulate the position of the source in the sky according to angles $\theta$ and $\phi$. $\endgroup$ – Lawrence B. Crowell Aug 1 '16 at 13:34
  • $\begingroup$ @LawrenceB.Crowell and triangulation would be impossible in the above scenario. I had assumed two detectors were mainly to reduce spurious signals. Thanks very much. $\endgroup$ – user108787 Aug 1 '16 at 13:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy