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Could anyone please explain what resonance in particle physics is and what resonance peaks are? Also how resonance relates to certain results? the certain results are the decay of a particle which leads to a positron energy, electron energy and an angle. the data i found was the reconstructed mass. how would i find the resonance peak of the reconstructed mass?

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    $\begingroup$ Do you understand the meaning of "resonance" in a simpler system (Like a driven mass on a spring, driven pendulum or something similar)? How much do you know about quantum mechanics in the first place; do you recognize the parts of the mathematical foundation of QM that are similar to the math for driven oscillators? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 30, 2016 at 18:33
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    $\begingroup$ Possible Duplicate of physics.stackexchange.com/questions/188015/… $\endgroup$
    – user108787
    Commented Jul 30, 2016 at 19:00
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    $\begingroup$ A resonance is an increase in the cross section of a process in some energy range due to the existence of an (unstable) state at the resonance energy (frequency). If you think about the vacuum as a bell that can be made to ring, a resonance would be one of the discrete tones on which the vacuum can ring. $\endgroup$
    – CuriousOne
    Commented Jul 30, 2016 at 21:10
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    $\begingroup$ the certain results are the decay of a particle which leads to a positron energy, electron energy and an angle. the data i found was the reconstructed mass. how would i find the resonance peak of the reconstructed mass? $\endgroup$
    – edelor69
    Commented Jul 31, 2016 at 10:48
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    $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne Please convert your comment to an answer. $\endgroup$
    – rob
    Commented Jul 31, 2016 at 17:52

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A resonance (in particle physics) is the peak located around a certain energy found in functions that quantify the given rate at which scattered particles can be detected at a given angle (in scattering experiments). The peaks are associated with subatomic particles and their excitations (i.e., any quantum state of these particles that is higher than ground state).

You can learn more about resonances in the context of particle physics here. You can learn about resonances in simpler systems (like those mentioned by dmckee) here. Hope this helps!

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