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Are there any experimental or simulation based studies where nanoparticles which lie on the substrate (defined by the x-y plane) and the polarisation (electric field direction) is along the z axis (i.e. normal to the plane of the substrate) are checked to see whether resonant signature is present or not ?

It will be helpful as most of the studies have focused on changing the polarisation from x to y but not from in-plane to out-of-plane.

I am not able to find much on this topic.

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  • $\begingroup$ If you are having trouble doing a literature review and finding articles you might want to expand on what you have attempted. I am sure that there are some good tips and tricks. $\endgroup$ Jul 29 '16 at 19:59
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    $\begingroup$ The surface enhanced Raman literature from the 1970s is full of examples. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Jul 30 '16 at 15:25
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I did a quick google scholar search of "oblique reflection polarization nanoparticles". I found some articles that spoke about p-polarization only then I searched the citing articles with "s-polarization" and found this

Localized Surface Plasmon Decay Pathways in Disordered Two-Dimensional Nanoparticle Arrays Tomasz J. Antosiewicz and Tomasz Tarkowski ACS Photonics 2015 2 (12), 1732-1738 DOI: 10.1021/acsphotonics.5b00420

I recommend using this article to do forward and reverse searches. Maybe toss in "s-polarization" to filter out the stuff you don't want.

If you don't know about the s and p designations read this Wikipedia: Polarization: s and p designations.

(Let me know if this is a bit short for an answer)

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    $\begingroup$ I want to discuss this issue in more detail here. Let say you incident p and s polarised light on a two dimensional nanoparticle array. At normal incidence, there is no difference between the two and with k vector normal to the sample, both polarisation will excite the nanoparticle with in plane resonance. This will lead to scattering which will be maximum in the plane normal to the substrate and get captured by the detector. $\endgroup$
    – Curious
    Aug 2 '16 at 14:11
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    $\begingroup$ At a glancing angle, lets say 85 degree from the surface normal, then p component will be nearly perpendicular to the surface of the sample. But the nanoparticles enveloped within the positive phase of the wave will have positive charge density which will suppress the resonance (ex. Transverse mode in a single nanoparticle chain). So according to my thinking, out of plane are not truly out of plane resonances. You need to incident light at some angle which is less than glancing to polarise the nanoparticle and collect scattered radiation. $\endgroup$
    – Curious
    Aug 2 '16 at 14:21
  • $\begingroup$ @Curious When you say, "This will lead to scattering which will be maximum in the plane normal to the substrate" what do you mean? There is not a single plane that is normal to the substrate. Do you mean the plane that the electric field is in and is normal to the substrate? If so, then I think I agree with your first comment but I am unsure as to where you are going with it. $\endgroup$ Aug 2 '16 at 18:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Curious When you say, "At a glancing angle, lets say 85 degree from the surface normal, then p component will be nearly perpendicular to the surface of the sample" I think you mean "s-component" because the p-component is parallel to the surface while "s" is the perpendicular one. Please correct me if I am wrong. $\endgroup$ Aug 2 '16 at 18:55
  • $\begingroup$ @Curious We will probably have to break this off as a chat soon. It also might be best if your questions were rehashed as a new SE physics question. The original question here is really just about how to find an article on a topic. Now we are chatting on an interesting but slightly off-topic issue. We can keep chatting but I just wanted to toss that out there. $\endgroup$ Aug 2 '16 at 18:58

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