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I'm still self-learning general relativity. I have been a huge fan of Andrew Hamilton's amazing lecture notes on GR, black holes and cosmology. He goes through GR in pretty much full tetrad formalism. The reason he wants to do that is because some of the physics becomes much easier to understand in local tetrad frame, where everything just follows special relativity. That's the reason people working with particle physics in GR are interested in working with tetrads, I suppose.

While I think Andrew Hamilton's notes are the most amazing thing in this world, I find myself sometimes wanting to read more books on tetrads and particle physics. That's why I'd like to ask if anyone knows more fairly comprehensive sources to learn about tetrads and particle physics in GR. One thing I sometimes find is lacking in the above notes is exercises / example calculations (only in some chapters). This is why I'd especially appreciate resources with many exercises to master the basics.

I'd like to think my background in GR is not too bad right now, but I still find myself struggling with quantum physics from time to time.

Thanks a lot!

Too Long Didnt Read

I would like resources which have the following:

  • General Relativity
  • Lots of tetrads
  • Particle physics
  • Exercises & applications
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Thanu Padmabhan's 'Gravitation: Foundation and Frontiers' is good both for General relativity and tetrad formalism.

Supergravity by Daniel Z Freedman and Antoine Van Proeyen has two chapters on differential geometry with first and second order formulations of general relativity. This is used to teach how to work with tetrads, also in conjunction with spinors. The book is very informative and teaches calculations very well, in general.

Antony Zee's Einstein Gravity in a nutshell is a book on general relativity that contains from the most basic concepts in general relativity to advanced topics which are useful for current research. The book is misnamed as a 'nutshell'(as Zee concedes in the preface) but is quite comprehensive.

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For GR, Straumann's General Relativity with Applications for Astrophysics uses the local tetrad approach extensively, but not exclusively. I seem to recall Chandrashekhar's The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes and this book also uses tetrads at places (the latter one also null-tetrads and spinors).

For particle physics, I second "Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell" by Zee, it also has quantum gravity, and tetrad/differential forms formalism for GR as well as for certain other areas too, and is one of the most easily understandable and fun to read QFT books I have ever seen.

If you want something more elementary for particles try "Modern Particle Physics" by Mark Thomson. It is not so much focused on QFT, as on the stuff that preceded QFT (but in a modern way), but also does deal with more elementary notions in QFT. You won't find gravity or tetrads there though, as far as I can recall.

EDIT: Also, pretty much any book that deals with Loop Quantum Gravity will use tetrads. Try Thiemann or Rovelli if this interests you.

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I strongly recommend that you look into book "General Relativity" by Wald if you havent yet. It uses tetrads and spinors only once in a while but it is one of the best textbooks I used.

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You don't list Q.M, but just in case on your way to particle physics:

Q.M. Exercises and applications: Squires and another book by Tamvakis, both called "Problems and Solutions in Q.M".

Although my questions sure don't display it, I learned a lot from both of these. Squires is particularly good, with a summary and longer answers for the basic aspects of Q.M. Also, the old standby, Schaums.

For Particle physics, I found it easiest to go out and buy Tony Zees Qft in a Nutshell, as it was highly recommend to me. Haven't read it in any depth yet, but just skimmed it and it looks comprensive. Free online texts include Srednicki's QFT textbook , which is a good bit easier to follow than Zee.

If you look to the right of the page, you should see a list of similar questions about resources.

Best of luck with it.

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protected by Qmechanic Jul 28 '16 at 18:46

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