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As we all know Venus's surface is so hot that it can probably melt lead. What would be in it's in core? Is it in the liquid or solid state? What would be it's temperature? How many cores does it have?

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    $\begingroup$ Did you do any prior research? The Wikipedia article and many other search results rather clearly state that little certain information is known about Venus internal structure. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Jul 22 '16 at 13:06
  • $\begingroup$ yea, i actually was searching on internet about venus core . din't find any required information there. wanted to know if there is any new update or additional information i can get here. $\endgroup$ – Nani Hari Jul 22 '16 at 13:54
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    $\begingroup$ Although you say the wikipedia article wasn't helpful, you have accepted an answer which is based on it. I googled your title and found several other relevant sites. If you want the latest information, your best bet is probably the NASA website, or SkyAndTelescope, space.com, UniverseToday or AstronomyNow. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Jul 25 '16 at 23:16
  • $\begingroup$ can i have any particular web links ? $\endgroup$ – Nani Hari Jul 26 '16 at 3:14
  • $\begingroup$ @NaniHari, just google NASA and the NASA website will be the first thing that comes up. Same with the others. $\endgroup$ – heather Jul 27 '16 at 14:13
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Scientists think that Venus' internal structure is somewhat like Earth's, as shown below:

venus structure

In other words, a crust, mantle, and core. The evidence points to Venus not having plate tectonics like Earth or a magnetic field. Venus also probably has a partially molten core, like Earth, as it has been cooling at the same rate.

Honestly, we don't know much else. We can tell you the atmosphere composition, but we don't know what the core is made up of. The Venus Wikipedia page (here) is very helpful and has more information and explanations of why we don't know these things.

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  • $\begingroup$ What scientists think this? The only indirect thing we know about Venus' core is that it does not have a net magnetization (i.e., Venus has no intrinsic magnetic field). This leads to several questions and ideas, but I cannot see them leading to Venus having a similar core to that of Earth (i.e., a nickel-iron molten core would likely generate a net magnetic field through a dynamo effect, like what occurs within Earth). Also, there is recent evidence that Venus is volcanic, so the tectonic remark may not be accurate. $\endgroup$ – honeste_vivere Jul 27 '16 at 12:30
  • $\begingroup$ @honeste_vivere, I got pretty much all of my facts from this website and it seems that they are pretty well accepted. $\endgroup$ – heather Jul 27 '16 at 12:42
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Venus's Mass is roughly $.815 M_e$. So it would not be unorthodox to hypothesize that it is molten, which is supported by the volcanoes on its surface. It probably has a solid molten metal core like ours, with a smaller mantle and the solid core region, with the core being smaller in proportion to the mantle then our core to mantle ratio.

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Venus core is probably made of iron and nickel. With a sprinkle of other elements. Also some radioactive elements might provide some heat in Venus' core. Its inner core might be solid but its outer core might be liquid. However the outer core will not be as fluid as here on Earth because of Venus's slow rotation. This is why Venus does not have a magnetic field. Venus's slow rotation is not able to make Venus's core create a magnetic field.

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