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Antennas usually work with FM waves, and AM waves, which mostly used in telecommunications. Information is transferred on FM, and AM waves by a transmitter transmitting information on these EM waves. Energy is transferred in all EM waves. Can antennas also receive higher frequency EM waves, and produce usable energy, as an electric current strong enough to sustain machinery to do a certain functions?

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  • $\begingroup$ I deleted some comments; please keep in mind that comments are not to be used for answering the question. $\endgroup$
    – David Z
    Commented Jul 8, 2016 at 21:46

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Since comments are not supposed to be used for answering questions, I think what you wish to know about is "wireless power transfer". Electromagnetic energy can be transmitted via a range of frequencies up to and including light (though am not sure if you want to count the optical resonator as an antenna). Taken from the link: "In landmark 1975 high power experiments, Brown demonstrated short range transmission of 475 W of microwaves at 54% DC to DC efficiency, and he and Robert Dickinson at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory transmitted 30 kW DC output power across 1.5 km with 2.38 GHz microwaves from a 26 m dish to a 7.3 x 3.5 m rectenna array. The incident-RF to DC conversion efficiency of the rectenna was 80%. In 1983 Japan launched MINIX (Microwave Ionosphere Nonlinear Interaction Experiment), a rocket experiment to test transmission of high power microwaves through the ionosphere."

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