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I am confused here a bit,i read that magnetic fields exert force only on charges moving but when we take magnet and keep it near a stationary metal (assume light in weight), the magnet attracts it? How does the magnet attracts the metal if it is not moving, is it because charges inside the metal are in motion?

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    $\begingroup$ Yep you answered your own question... $\endgroup$ – lemon Jun 14 '16 at 8:53
  • $\begingroup$ You are using the language of classical electrodynamics. In quantum mechanics also static objects can interact magnetically, i.e. see electron spin or electron magnetic moment. $\endgroup$ – Jannick Jun 14 '16 at 9:05
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If you consider a "pure" electric point charge without any further characteristics such as a magnetic moment etc., then it IS NOT attracted by a permanent magnet. Only if it is moving, the Lorentz force will act perpendicular to the moving direction.

If, however, you consider a (ferromagnetic) metal then it will experience a force. Classically, this phenomenon can't be understood, because in a metal no charges are moving if no voltage is applied. If you look at it quantum-mechanically the angular momentum of the electrons in the orbitals of atom cause a magnetic moment. This magnetic moment will interact with the magnetic field of the permanent magnet.

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