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Is it possible that we stop the absorption of radiation completely? if so, will we stop emission from our own body?

Does the radiation emission depends upon absorption?

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  • $\begingroup$ Free space doesn't absorb any radiation. That doesn't stop matter from emitting radiation, though. Why would it? $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jun 7 '16 at 0:59
  • $\begingroup$ I've seen some statements online that an emission can't happen unless there is an absorber who will absorb it. Didn't make any sense then nor now.@KawaiKx, please explain your idea, and why you think it might be so? $\endgroup$ – Bob Bee Jun 7 '16 at 1:17
  • $\begingroup$ One might at least contemplate either the Onsager relation, or the thermodynamic implications of a body that can emit but not absorb radiation. That is, if I understand your actual question. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jun 7 '16 at 3:14
  • $\begingroup$ The question is too broad. As mentioned below, radiation and absorption are indeed non-trivially connected (and this is the reason that lasers work), but in a practical sense it is impossible to prevent human body from emitting or absorbing radiation. What exactly do you want to know? $\endgroup$ – Andrii Magalich Jun 7 '16 at 20:53
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Yes, there is a direct quantum mechanical connection between absorption and emission through something called the Einstein coefficients. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein_coefficients

If a material has zero probability of making an absorptive radiative transition between quantum state 1 and quantum state 2 (where state 2 has the higher energy), then there is also zero probability of a radiative transition between states 2 and 1, either by spontaneous or stimulated emission.

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Anything can emit radiation if it has mass just from acceleration alone. The question is can there really be a mass that is incapable of adsorption. Also blackbody radiation does not depend on absorption.

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