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So, basically I have been learning Quantum Mechanics online and I leant about the double slit experiment with electrons, wherein if you try to detect an electron with a light source having wavelength shorter than the distance between the slits, you will not get the required results.

But since charges can be detected via a capacitor, why can't we detect the electron after it has passed a slit using a capacitor?

Please excuse the sloppy terminology, I am just beginning to learn.

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    $\begingroup$ you will still measure the electron positioj in the screen without the need of a capacitor, what you will not get is the interference pattern, that is what it is meant by not getting the required (desired quantum behavior) results $\endgroup$ – user83548 Jun 5 '16 at 23:55
  • $\begingroup$ If by "capacitor" you mean an electrode connected to a charge sensitive preamplifier, electrons can be detected this way and I have detected plenty of electrons this way myself. You could look for a single electron transistor detector version of the double-slit experiment, if that idea excites you. It basically combines a non-trivial experiment ( single electron transistor) with a trivial one (double slit). If you can live with electron multipliers, there is always the good old MCP en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microchannel_plate_detector and there is a new method with cyclotron radiation. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jun 6 '16 at 0:00
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    $\begingroup$ the answer to this question physicscentral.com/experiment/askaphysicist/… may help you see how the dimensions of the experiment make the use of detectors difficult due to the interplay of dimensions :slit distance, interference pattern, de broglie wavelength $\endgroup$ – anna v Jun 6 '16 at 3:58
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    $\begingroup$ this is an experiment arxiv.org/pdf/1210.6243.pdf $\endgroup$ – anna v Jun 6 '16 at 4:04
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Measurements disturb the double slit experiment because of the particle nature of light and matter. In order to measure which slit the electron passes through there must be some sort of interaction to detect the electron. By putting a capacitor in the way, you would drastically affect the particle. Think of it like putting a hose-pipe in front of a rolling ball.

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