0
$\begingroup$

Are gravity and gravitation the same thing?

Actually I have 2 teachers at my school. One of the said that gravitation is the force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe due to their masses and gravity is the force of attraction between one normal body and another heavenly body.

But the other teacher said that both the gravitation and gravity refer to the force of attraction between two bodies one of which is very much massive such as earth.

Which one of them is correct? Can anyone help me?

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

There is no fundamental difference between the two terms, except that in certain situations one or the other have come to be used more often.

Gravity is more often used to describe the concept ("Newtonian Gravity"), the force (the "Force of Gravity").
Gravitation is more often used for phenomena resulting from gravity ("Gravitational Waves", "Gravitating Objects").

These are only general tendencies, as (for example), one often also hears "Gravitational Force" (i.e. but rarely "Gravity Force" or "Force of Gravitation").

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ the force of attraction between the earth and the object is called gravity or gravitation? $\endgroup$ – user335710 May 16 '16 at 17:43
  • $\begingroup$ @user335710 "gravity" is the force between any two massive objects. $\endgroup$ – DilithiumMatrix May 16 '16 at 18:04
0
$\begingroup$

Gravity is the physical phenomena by which bodies attract themselves. It is the effect we observe.

Gravitation is a model, a theory to explain the observed phenomena. The Newtonian Gravitation explains this phenomena in terms of attractive forces generated by massive bodies. It dos not depend whether the bodies are terrestrial or celestial. General Relativity (aka Einstein's Gravitation) explains the interaction in terms of spacetime deformations generated by mass and energy.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.