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I'm interested in knowing the structure of a CNOT gate, in quantum computing. THe problem with that is, that I've read how the structure of a nuclear quantum computer works, but I still don't understand how that can be implemented to create a quantum CNOT gate. I've read the article of the original proposal of Cirac-Zoller, but it wasn't explained very good, I guess, so I want to ask, if someone has a link to some publication where it's explained better than there, possibly with more pictures rather then formulas. Thanks.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean a nuclear-spin QC? I have not heard of suggestion of a nuclear QC, which would be a different "beast", indeed! Just curious... are there actually suggestions to use the nuclear force for quantum computing? Cirac-Zoller were proposing computing with atomic states, I believe, but they were adapting techniques that had been used in nuclear-spin-resonance before, which is not very far fetched. Even I did a student experiment with optical magnetic resonance. It's quite cute to see an optical spin echo! $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne May 14 '16 at 11:36
  • $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? physics.stackexchange.com/questions/173776/… $\endgroup$ – Rococo May 14 '16 at 17:40
  • $\begingroup$ Since a CNOT gate is a manipulation in a seven-dimensional space, I'm not aware of any simple pictorial representation, unfortunately. $\endgroup$ – Rococo May 14 '16 at 17:43
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Quantum Computing Devices: Principles, Designs, and Analysis, (2007) provides the background theory, followed by a chapter for each of the technologies that was actively being explored when it was prepared.

The experimental chapters provide detailed information that ties the experimental apparatus to its mathematical representation. I recommend this a a good starting point.

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