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Just like the creation of X-rays. Where fast moving electrons are bombarded on some heavy element. What happens if the we keep compressed hydrogen instead of the heavy metals?

Surely it will form minimal X-rays. But hydrogen has one proton and one electron.

So my question is,
If an electron hits the nucleus will it throw the proton out of nucleus and take its place? Talking about very fast moving electrons hitting a proton.

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  • $\begingroup$ Electrons can transfer enough energy to nuclei to displace them from lattice sites in crystals. But, the electron does not take the atom's place. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer May 13 '16 at 13:44
  • $\begingroup$ Why not ? It will hit the nucleus and since they attract each other the probability of hitting the nucleus increases. $\endgroup$ – Darshan Jadav May 13 '16 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ Well, run the numbers for conservation of energy and momentum. You will need electrons with several hundreds of keV to kick an atom off a lattice site, so remember to use relativistic momentum for the electron. Recall that an electron has way less mass than even a proton. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer May 13 '16 at 16:53
  • $\begingroup$ Xrays are formed with a potential difference of 50-100KV so increasing some hundreds in a controlled manner. It will kick the proton or neutron off ? $\endgroup$ – Darshan Jadav May 13 '16 at 18:08
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Electron bombardment of neutral atoms produces X-rays by ionizing the atoms, not by removing the outermost "valence" electrons like you do when you rub a balloon on your hair, but by removing the innermost electrons. The ionized atoms neutralize by picking up charge from the environment into their valence shells. However the hole is the inner shell is filled by electrons "falling" from the next innermost shell, and so on.

Bombarding hydrogen atoms with electrons with more than 13 eV kinetic energy completely ionizes the atoms. The most energetic photons that can be emitted by a hydrogen atom are in transitions to the innermost $n=1$ orbital, which emit the Lyman series of ultraviolet photons.

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If the electron hit the proton they would annihilate each other. If the electron hit the orbiting electron it would knockout the electron and an another high electron dumps it energy as a photon and jumps in the orbit. Plus it is very hard to knockout the electron of the hydrogen atom because for one it's a gas and the size is small so the chances of the electron hit either the proton or electRon is like one in a million.

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