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As known, fractal antennas are used for example in cell phones. But why is it that so many different kinds of frequencies can be filtered out of the forest of radio waves surrounding us? Is it because of the self-similarity, when you look at different scales of the antenna pattern?

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  • $\begingroup$ Sounds like a question for electronics.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$
    – user56903
    Commented May 12, 2016 at 10:51
  • $\begingroup$ Very interesting subject. As an aside, may I ask if anyone know for any similar treatments in biology-biophysics? Thanks. $\endgroup$ Commented May 12, 2016 at 16:17
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    $\begingroup$ You seem to know a lot of things that are just not so... like that one can generate energy with antennas. :-) $\endgroup$
    – CuriousOne
    Commented May 12, 2016 at 21:54
  • $\begingroup$ @descheleschilder Thanks for the reference. By treatments I mean any research- modeling of a biological procedure by similar means as above: that is modeling a situation with fractal behavior at some level and model the interactions (of some type) of that situation by showing similar behavior as that of the frequencies. I know what I say is somewhat abstract or miss-stated. Thanks anyway. $\endgroup$ Commented May 13, 2016 at 16:25
  • $\begingroup$ @ConstantineBlack I think there are many fractal forms in biology, as you probably know by now. The blood veins system, tree branches, forms of leaves, curled DNA, etc. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 20, 2020 at 3:24

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Yes, it's because of self-similarity, although self-similarity alone doesn't guarantee$^1$ good performance. I believe you can understand a fractal antenna as a collection of many antennas of different size/scales put together in a very compact way.

$^1$The full-text of the paper is available here.

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