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I am an undergraduate student in physics and mathematics and one of my early dreams in physics was to understand the way nuclear weapons work.

Is there a book which deals with the physics and the problems arising with the manufacture of such weapons. All I can find on the internet and in my library is some non scientist articles dealing with the manhattan project (which I am not really interested in) I just want to understand the physics of it.

My knowledge in physics is: Quantum physics and quantum electrodynamics ( a little bit), special relativity and a bit of quantum optics and physics of particles. I am also taking a statistical physics course.

I searched the site for an answer but didn't find it.

Please let me know if you now some accurate books for this problem (even if it is hard). Thank you.

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    $\begingroup$ You have to realize that nuclear weapons knowledge is classified and will not be available on the net or even in bookshops and libraries. Do you think governments want the knowledge to be as available as the construction of a Molotov bomb? If you are that interested, go into nuclear physics and try to get a government job in the military research $\endgroup$ – anna v May 11 '16 at 18:59
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    $\begingroup$ @anna v : This is not clear to me because I think that making a nuclear weapon need a lot of materials that are really not accessible like uranium or plutonium. But I see no harm in understanding the way it works. So why would articles designed for the great public deals with some "principles of the atomic bomb" trying to explain people how it works. $\endgroup$ – John Marjan May 11 '16 at 19:18
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    $\begingroup$ The making of a bomb is an engineering project, not a physics one. The physics part ends with how nuclear reactions happen. The exact geometries and other designes are classified. $\endgroup$ – anna v May 11 '16 at 19:30
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    $\begingroup$ Absolutely nothing stops you from re-engineering a nuclear weapon. You have all the tools that it takes in physics libraries that contain nuclear physics textbooks and data collections. You have a supercomputer in front of you for the neutron transport calculations, something they didn't have in Los Alamos. OTOH, governments have spent trillions of dollars on nuclear technology and they have both a right and an interest to secrecy. Would you ask Intel how they are making your CPU? What would you expect for an answer? "Go fish!" is all you will ever get from them. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne May 11 '16 at 20:27
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    $\begingroup$ Of course the conceptual basics of both fission and fission-fusion-fission bomb processes are well known despite their classified status, but as with all engineering the devil is in the details and many (most?) of those are pretty well concealed by the various groups that have the knowledge. There are always bomb-related jobs available for nuclear physicists who can get the right clearance (my experience is in the US). But they are career black-holes; once you go in it is very hard to get a comparably responsible job on the outside because you can't detail what you've been doing. $\endgroup$ – dmckee May 11 '16 at 20:48
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Since the question has not been closed, here are a few references on the subject that exist on the net. Of course a nuclear physics course is a prerequisite for serious physics studies.

http://ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/sts152_02/handout02.pdf

http://www.abomb1.org/nuketech/ this has many more references inside.

http://nuclearweaponarchive.org/Nwfaq/Nfaq2.html

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