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Is it possible for gravitational waves to be able to produce phenomenon such as interference and polarization etc. which are observed in standard waves. Also is it possible for gravitational waves to have a particulate nature. If so what kind of a particle it would be. and since waves are disturbances in a medium or a field what kind of disturbances gravitational waves really are

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, gravitational waves have all the usual properties of "standard waves" (whatever you mean by that). What is a "particulate nature"? Are gravitational waves quantized? Maybe, but nobody knows. Not all waves are quantized. Sound waves and gravity waves on the surface of the ocean, for instance, are not. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne May 2 '16 at 8:20
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    $\begingroup$ Cough, phonons, cough :-) $\endgroup$ – John Rennie May 2 '16 at 8:31
  • $\begingroup$ The medium that you refer to is a very intreguing question and one we're trying to understand. Though it seems to strongly encourage the idea of being the fabric of space-time itself that Einstein imagined being manipulated by gravitational forces. $\endgroup$ – Neil May 2 '16 at 8:32
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "since waves are disturbances in a medium"? What is the medium for the electro-magnetic waves? $\endgroup$ – MBN May 2 '16 at 10:00
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To answer this one by one, as it has to some extend been in the comments:

1.) Gravitational waves have all the usual properties that classical waves have. E.g. they can interfere etc.

2.) General relativity, the theory in which grav. waves are described, is a classical field theory. In that sense, grav. waves are a classical phenomenon. At the moment, there is no quantum description of gravitation and hence no "particle associated with the gravitational field". In a naive argument, since the gravitational field is a tensor field, the associated particle would be of spin 2. But as I said, there is no working theory behind this.

3.) Gravitational waves are disturbances of the gravitational field. This is described in General Relativity through the curvature of spacetime. In that sense, gravitational fields are disturbaces of the curvature of the spacetime we live in.

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