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The ice is cloudy at the center and has a transparent layer

This fell at my place during a hailstorm. I can not figure it out why it is like this.

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Water freezes from the outside in, as the outside is exposed to the coldest temperature. Therefore any impurities as pushed inwards as the water crystallises. These impurities are then compacted in the centre of the ice, making it cloudy as seen in your photo.

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you explain in more detail or give some link on how this freezing happens $\endgroup$ – Jolie Apr 20 '16 at 16:40
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    $\begingroup$ Are you sure this is the right answer? I was under the impression it was micro-cracks due to stresses from expanding ice. $\endgroup$ – user12029 Apr 20 '16 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ yeah @NeuroFuzzy I too was thinking similarly $\endgroup$ – Jolie Apr 20 '16 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ @NeuroFuzzy I think the two ideas are linked; slowly freezing the ice would mean less micro-cracks, yet this would be pointless if you had water with a lot of impurities. $\endgroup$ – Noah P Apr 20 '16 at 17:17
  • $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice#Formation here in the first paragraph it explains that this effect is indeed due to impurities, such as soil particles or even small air bubbles. $\endgroup$ – cla Nov 16 '16 at 18:07

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