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I know the conductivity of water is based on whatever is dissolved into the solution, hence pure water does not conduct electricity.

However, these ions in solution must also be free to move around.

If I keep a non Newtonian fluid in motion it will become hardened. Would this stop the ions from moving enough to impede it from conducting electricity?

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    $\begingroup$ Sounds like it's time for an experiment! $\endgroup$ – Duncan Harris Apr 15 '16 at 13:59
  • $\begingroup$ It doesn't. See John R's answer; also you might consider the example of diamond, which is electrically insulating but thermally conductive. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Apr 15 '16 at 15:48
  • $\begingroup$ I beg to differ with John Rennie on this one. A non-Newtonian fluid is a percolation system (i.e. one in which gap distances matter for the dynamics). The movement of ions in the gaps is not a trivial mean field problem and I would suspect some effects, but modeling those would be hard. As Duncan Harris suggest, do an experiment. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Apr 15 '16 at 18:08
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The thickening of oobleck and similar materials is due to a phenomenon called dilatancy. This happens because shearing the suspension forces the water to flow at very high shear rates through the restricted gaps between the solid particles, and that requires a very high shear stress.

However the water itself is not thickened in any way, and its electrical conductivity is unaffected. There will be no effect of shear rate on the conductivity for a suspension like oobleck.

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