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How would the frequency and energy of a pressure inverted sound wave compare to the frequency and energy of the original sound? Would it sound any different?

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  • $\begingroup$ Sound waves do not invert when reflecting off of "hard" surfaces/boundaries. Meaning, the high density/pressure pulse of a reflected sound wave is the same as the incident wave, i.e., no phase change. So I am not sure the title of your question is accurate. You could change it and just ask whether the ear would respond differently to an inverted (i.e., rarefaction) pressure pulse than a normal pressure pulse. $\endgroup$ – honeste_vivere Apr 12 '16 at 20:03
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A sound wave with inverted phase does not sound any different from the original. However it does interact differently with other sound waves so switching a phase of a single wave in a complex sound field would result in an audible change.

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