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In the double slit experiment with photons, the interacting observer is an instrument, detector… If you replace the detector with a piece of metal with the same mass as the mass of the detector, the wave will collapse?

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In this experiment a changeable detection is designed

Overall, the results suggest that the type of scattering an electron undergoes determines the mark it leaves on the back wall, and that a detector at one of the slits can change the type of scattering. The physicists concluded that, while elastically scattered electrons can cause an interference pattern, the inelastically scattered electrons do not contribute to the interference process.

So, imo, a double slit experiment with detectors at the slits changes the boundary conditions , whether the detectors are active or not, at least this how what this more recent experiment can be interpreted.

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  • $\begingroup$ "imo"? Do we really have to resort to web talk here? And are you asserting a fact or stating an opinion, because it sincerely looks like you're trying to assert a fact here. $\endgroup$ – Neil Apr 5 '16 at 6:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Neil the double slit experiment unfortunately does have opinions. I do not have a link for the experiment you state has inactive detectors at the slit and I am willing to change opinion if there exists a physics proof that when detectors are turned off the diffraction pattern appears, when on not. $\endgroup$ – anna v Apr 5 '16 at 7:11
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No. The strange behavior of the photons is directly related to the observation of which slit the photon passes through. Once it is no longer an observer, and by observer we mean that we detect the presence of a photon, the results change. The original experiment kept the detector in place and simply did not activate it, so it would have had the same weight of course.

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  • $\begingroup$ do you have a link for this "original experiment"? $\endgroup$ – anna v Apr 4 '16 at 15:45
  • $\begingroup$ I don't believe an observer is required. Can you show your original link? If you place anything between the slit and The detection screen that can block photons then you will disturb or destroy the pattern. $\endgroup$ – Bill Alsept Apr 4 '16 at 16:05

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