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It's usually said that "the direct observation of a process makes the wave function of the system to collapse".

How does really that process happen? What exactly means for a wave function to collapse?

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    $\begingroup$ Related questions have been asked a million times - well, 833 times anyway. You need to do a bit of research then edit your question to make it more focussed. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Apr 2 '16 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnRennie Well usually I search for questions, and I thought I would have found a questions similar or identical to this, with tens of up votes (which sometimes means: great questions with great answers) but for this I didn't.. this is why I asked for it again. I'll search anyhow! $\endgroup$ – Les Adieux Apr 2 '16 at 14:07
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    $\begingroup$ Try the link in my comment. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Apr 2 '16 at 14:09
  • $\begingroup$ @HeliumAtom: in my view the reason why such a question with tens of upvotes does not exist is that most of the Quantum information people on this site seem to think that the question is either solved and completely trivial, already answered in another question or not a physics question. All of these are probably true, nevertheless it makes asking about Quantum information quite difficult, which is probably intended, since otherwise the site gets polluted. $\endgroup$ – Wolpertinger Apr 2 '16 at 20:09
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We don't know. To find out we would have to come up with a theory and an experiment to verify such a theory. Unfortunately while we aren't short on theories, we don't know how to test them experimentally.

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  • $\begingroup$ This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review $\endgroup$ – honeste_vivere Apr 2 '16 at 15:11
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    $\begingroup$ @honeste_vivere It does answer the question because there is no answer as yet. Physicists aren't even sure if wave functions collapse at all (i.e., the Many Worlds Interpretation). $\endgroup$ – Mark H Apr 2 '16 at 19:19
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I am assuming the context is entanglement. In common language - The wave function does not collapse. Instead, the correlation of the wave function of the two entangled particles collapse. The wave function is such that the two particles are expected to give correlated outcome when measured. On the first measurement, the measured particle attains a different wave function and so, the correlation collapse.

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