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Fran De Aquino suggested VLF currents would trigger a mass shift in high mu metal. But my question is how is a magnetic field actually blocked in high permeability metal?

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  • $\begingroup$ Not sure I understand your question, but if you make an enclosure of mu-metal to shield something that you place within, the enclosure does not block the magnetic field: Instead, it diverts the magnetic field. The magnetic lines of force prefer to follow the highly permeable mu-metal instead of the free space that is enclosed within the box. (mecamagnetic.com/mumetal/images/softmag3.gif) $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Mar 29 '16 at 20:14
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Magnetic forces aren't "blocked" in high permeability metal, rather redirected through it. Mu metal in particular, is made up of a combination of nickel, iron, molybdenum, and various other assortments. These combinations, along with a process called annealing, make for a very permeable metal that allows the magnetic field lines able to pass through the mu metal easier than open air. As with most things in nature, the path of least resistance is always the chosen path. Hope that helps.

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