0
$\begingroup$

Am studying in 8th grade and I studied electrostatic force which says opposite charge attracts and same charges repel But in an atom electron is just situated above the proton and it doesn't attracts.Why?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by ACuriousMind, John Rennie quantum-mechanics Mar 26 '16 at 12:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ In quantum mechanics, there is a wavefunction which gives probabilities for where the electron could be. The wavefunction can't shrink to a point and stay that way, it spreads out again. This is described by Schroedinger's equation. So where the electron might be is always spread out in space. $\endgroup$ – Mitchell Porter Mar 26 '16 at 13:21
  • $\begingroup$ For a deeper theory there is Bohmian mechanics. There is an extra force in Bohmian mechanics called the quantum potential, and it is what opposes the classical electrostatic attraction. No one knows if Bohmian mechanics is the right path behind quantum mechanics and hardly anyone studies it, but it does give a non-probabilistic explanation of why the electron doesn't fall into the nucleus and stay there. $\endgroup$ – Mitchell Porter Mar 26 '16 at 13:26
  • $\begingroup$ People used to think electron moving in circle is accelerating and thus lose energy by glowing, so inevitably you guess it. Unfortunately that's not what happen and so people develop a prototype of QM😎 $\endgroup$ – user6760 Mar 26 '16 at 14:03
  • $\begingroup$ Nils Bohr spend half his life time to answer this question. There is no 'simple' answer, or it would have taken humanity not 100 years to find it. $\endgroup$ – Aganju Mar 26 '16 at 15:07
  • $\begingroup$ The following may be of interest to you? chem1.com/acad/webtut/atomic/WhyTheElectron.html $\endgroup$ – jim Mar 26 '16 at 20:57
-1
$\begingroup$

Simplest answer? If we lived in a universe where the rules were such that electrons did spiral into the nucleus then we wouldn't exist and be able to answer the question.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ But why it doesn't fall into nucleus? $\endgroup$ – nihaljp Mar 26 '16 at 12:14
  • $\begingroup$ Because of the rules that operate in our universe. Don't know why the rules are the way they are. $\endgroup$ – jim Mar 26 '16 at 12:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Yeah but there are indeed some scientific explanations. $\endgroup$ – nihaljp Mar 26 '16 at 12:16
  • $\begingroup$ simplified image: the electrons rotate around the nucleus, the resulting centrifugal force is equal to the attraction by the nucleus (like the situation between sun and earth) $\endgroup$ – Lenoil Mar 26 '16 at 12:26
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The anthropic principle is a good answer to creationists who say things like, "Given the extreme improbability of life spontaneously arising anywhere, shouldn't we be skeptical about it spontaneously arising here?" It's a pretty lousy answer to questions about why this or that or some other thing is true. $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Mar 26 '16 at 17:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.