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Another question concerning classical physics. On Earth, the combination of air resistance and gravity interact in a way that creates the phenomenon of terminal velocity. Do other fluids (for example, water) have 'terminal velocities?' And if so, how are they different? I assume they must(I don't really know though), since both air and water are fluids, but the dynamic between gravity and fluids should make for some interesting variations in interactions nonetheless.

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In addition to the gravitational field of the planet Earth, any drag force due to any fluid, which is monotonically increasing with velocity, would result in an equation of motion the solution of which features the fact that velocity would approach a maximum value asymptotically. This happens when drag force equals to the driving gravitational force.

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  • $\begingroup$ It is my pleasure, $\endgroup$ – Benjamin Mar 14 '16 at 18:12

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