0
$\begingroup$

Is it possible, using the surface tension of a soap bubble, to calculate the maximum pressure (created by the air flow) it can withstand while still attached to the orifice to prevent it from bursting? The idea behind being to estimate the maximum air velocity for a given orifice diameter.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ If you blow a soap bubble the bubble is coloured due to an interference between reflections from its two surfaces. Often just before the bubble burst all that colouration disappears. This is due to the bubble becoming thinner and thinner eventually be so thin that only destructive interference occurs. So the thickness of the soap film does not stay constant and it might be very difficult to answer your question in that you will probably need to know the original thickness of the soap film. Another possible problem is that as the bubble gets bigger the pressure within it gets less. $\endgroup$ – Farcher Mar 13 '16 at 12:36
1
$\begingroup$

Actually the physics of soap bubbles has been studied seriously very recently and published at PRL. You probably find your answer there.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.