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I'm having trouble understanding why the current that goes through the 6 ohm resistor is 1A when the proportion of the parallel resistors is 2:1 from top to bottom.

Could anyone explain how current splits in a parallel circuit such as this one? Thanks in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ Do you know Ohm's law? $\endgroup$ – The Photon Mar 12 '16 at 2:15
  • $\begingroup$ The voltage across the 6 ohm resistor is the same as that across the 12 ohm resistor, right? Just use V/R=I and to determine the currents. It should be apparent that the ratio of the currents is the inverse of the ratio of the two resistances. $\endgroup$ – user93237 Mar 12 '16 at 2:52
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    $\begingroup$ "Could anyone explain how current splits in a parallel circuit such as this one?" - of course. But is it too much to ask that you show even a small amount of effort researching this frequently asked question? Voting to close. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Mar 12 '16 at 3:11
  • $\begingroup$ Consider the nodes entering and leaving the set of parallel resistors: we know that the current entering the first node is equal to the current leaving the second node, and that the voltage drop has to be the same for each of the parallel resistors because they share the two nodes. Given those two constraints, and Ohm's law for each resistor, the current can only divide in one way. $\endgroup$ – Peter Diehr Mar 12 '16 at 3:21
  • $\begingroup$ This was a test question to see how a community responds to an obvious FAQ, the question is now closed. $\endgroup$ – Xylius Mar 12 '16 at 7:06
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Current has to do with the conservation of electric charge while voltage has to do with the conservation of electric potential energy. Knowing this, please do some research as to see why this is the case and how it relates to your concerns.

Thanks,

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I think this will surely help you. The 1st boxed formula is for quicker calculation provided you know any one current entering the branch. If not, then the last 2 boxed formulas will do the job. Its important that you know and understand the derivation which i have shown because in case you forget, you can derive them in less than 5 minutes. Also, the last two boxed equations are preferred, because in 90% questions, only the total current is given.Current in two branches for parallel combination

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