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This question already has an answer here:

This guy here says space is not empty..

It explains how space inside nucleus is Full of fields. Does it mean to say gluons are present everywhere, even outside nucleus?

Consider a region without any dust or photon.

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marked as duplicate by Norbert Schuch, ACuriousMind, Kyle Kanos, Qmechanic Mar 10 '16 at 16:32

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    $\begingroup$ Please make the question self contained, do not rely on the content of Youtube links, which can rot. Also, define what you mean by "empty". Usual space has always a dust particles or something like that in it. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Mar 9 '16 at 14:42
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    $\begingroup$ @ACuriousMind YouTube is more dependable then any other video references, but you should keep redundant sites and broken links/rot flagged for deletion. Also down voted answers don't mean they are wrong. Just someone with a trigger down voting finger with anything not followed by a formula. $\endgroup$ – Muze the good Troll. Mar 10 '16 at 10:15
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Depends upon the what is meant by "Empty".

Empty of mass/matter -> Yes

Empty of anything we can detect -> Yes

Empty of energy -> May be

Empty of negative/dark energy -> May be not

Empty of any imaginable properties -> No

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    $\begingroup$ Empty space is a sea of virtual particles and fluctuating quantum fields. There definitely is matter and energy in any bit of space you could ever look at (though there is also just as much antimatter). This is detectable in many ways such as the Casimir force and vacuum polarization. $\endgroup$ – Mason Mar 9 '16 at 19:48
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    $\begingroup$ Well, Casimir effect would be counted as a property, like gravity is a property. I did not include these under detection. I am not sure if there can be any space totally devoid of gravitational effect. The fields and virtual particles fall under last line. Energy - that is why, I said may be. Matter - you have a point, but that point is only valid sporadically at different places, different times. You can not go there and detect a particle anytime you want to. $\endgroup$ – kpv Mar 9 '16 at 20:18

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