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Are there any peer-reviewed theories which explore the idea that black holes in our universe may spawn other universes - or that our universe came from a black-hole-like event in another universe?

If so, what are the names of those theories and their authors? If not, why not?

This is due to the observation (perhaps superficial) that black holes seem to share similarities with the beginnings of the universe - a singularity, a change in the relative dynamics of the forces, and a heavy warping of space and time.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by CuriousOne, Qmechanic Mar 4 '16 at 10:25

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  • $\begingroup$ The curvature of the early universe was, as far as we can tell... flat. Black holes are "classical" solutions, so it's not clear what you mean by "breakdown of classical physics". No change in the dynamics of quantum physics has ever been observed or is postulated by models for quantum gravity. As far as I can tell every one of your points is based on a misconception, so far. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Mar 4 '16 at 10:26
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    $\begingroup$ To reopen this question (v1) please define what is meant by "other universes in other dimensions". $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Mar 4 '16 at 10:27
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    $\begingroup$ The geometry of the Big Bang is very different to the singularity at the centre of a black hole. However there have been suggestions that black holes can be linked to other universes. This relies on patching together a Schwarzschild and de Sitter geometry in a rather ad hoc and physically unmotivated way. see for example Has the universe we live in started as a black hole that is imploding?. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Mar 4 '16 at 10:40
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    $\begingroup$ Also Maximum curvature in a black hole and How does the friedmon solution to Einstein's equations resolve paradox of bounded infinities?. Most of would regard this as highly speculative to say the least. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Mar 4 '16 at 10:41
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    $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne: re your first comment, the curvature of a spacelike slice of the early universe appears to be flat. The whole universe is most certainly not flat, has never been and if dark energy is real never will be. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Mar 4 '16 at 10:48