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I do not know where to ask this question in the first place, but I think here would be a start.

Is there a possibility that if we go inside the smallest particle (which we have not discovered yet; since we can go smaller.. and smaller.. and smaller..) we would find some kind of a universe just like ours?

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    $\begingroup$ If there's a universe inside, it's not the smallest particle, so no. $\endgroup$
    – Asher
    Mar 4, 2016 at 4:58

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Up to now we have never encounter "true fractality" in the hierarchical cascade of "atoms" (to the greek sense) the matter is made ok: atoms are not like molecules. nucleus and electrons are not like atoms. protons and neutrons are different. Quarks and gluons are a lot different to them. And there are really quantum units of things that you can't subdivide. And the gravity plays to large distance rather than to short distance where electrostatic forces for instance rules a lot more. So your small "universe" could not be made of electric charges and photons and so on, for instance, and would be organised with subparticules and force making it totally different to our. Besides, From molecules and below the hierarchy is very tight, why our macroscopic world is a lot more loose. But at the same time, uncertainty principle make the notion of distances and positions more and more blurry at the very small scales. So your small universe would be constrained by all this.

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