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As per my knowledge orange color object (say orange) absorbs other color light except orange color light. So we can see orange object as orange.

If this is true then is it possible "In a ideal light free room, If we put pure red light on a pure orange color object, we will see nothing? Because orange color object will absorbs red light"

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It's possible but not likely.

It's possible to have an orange object that reflects a very narrow band of wavelengths, say 589 to 591 nm, and absorbs all others. This object would be difficult to see if illuminated only with narrow-band red light (like a HeNe laser). Of course, absorbtion is also never perfect so even if illuminated with blue light it would likely be possible for a sufficiently sensitive sensor to detect the object.

But for natural objects it's much more likely that it reflects a relatively broad range of wavelengths, but reflects most strongly in the orange band. For example, an object reflecting wavelengths between 570 and 640 nm, peaking around 590 or 600 nm, would likely be perceived as orange. But 640 nm is well into the red band, so this object would be visible (and look red) if illuminated with a monochromatic red light.

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the problem is that there are no such things as "red" or "orange", or to be more precise, the colors named after your perceptions and painting rules are not the same than the physical colors showing in the rainbow. I.e. there are plenty of different light spectrum that you see as "red", and same for "orange", which is called metamerism. If these spectrums are really "orthogonal" (no frequency in common) they you will see black. But many "orange" and "red" spectrums do have frequencies in common, and you will see these. Sometime it gives a very inintuitive color, as for some gems. Another example: blood under water looks green. :-)

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