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Why do inelastic scattering of nuclei as well as their electric multipole radiative transition (via say Coulomb excitation) show similar collective enhancement, even though electromagnetic field interacts only with protons while inelastic scattering affects all nucleons?

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    $\begingroup$ This question is too vague, you have to give more details preferably in links of what you are talking about and the terminology you are using, the energy range . $\endgroup$ – anna v Feb 21 '16 at 7:04
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It's due to the strong force binding of the nucleus; early experiments which noted these very results you describe imply that there is something extra going on in the nucleus to hold it together.

Of course, as the energy scale goes up, and enters the nuclear regime, things begin to break up.

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  • $\begingroup$ So in the region of Coulomb-nuclear interference, the collective enhancement due to inelastic scattering would not be similar to that due to Coulomb excitation? The collectivity parameters would no longer be the same? $\endgroup$ – Ana Feb 22 '16 at 4:38

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