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By same charge I mean that same nature of charge i.e " Both positive or Both negative " . To be more specific consider two plates both of the plates are held face to face close to each other much like a capacitor but unlike a capacitor they both have positive charge so will there be a potential difference between them >?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "same charge between them"? Why do you write "p.d" and "potential diff"? Is it too much trouble for you to write the full words? $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Feb 9 '16 at 16:50
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry about that so its fixed now $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 16:55
  • $\begingroup$ In general yes, though your question is phrased too vaguely to be usefully answered. For example the potential of a charged sphere (relative to infinity) is $Q/4\pi\epsilon r$ so two identical spheres with different charges $Q$ will have different potentials. To say more than this you'll need to be more specific about what ou're asking. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Feb 9 '16 at 16:58
  • $\begingroup$ how about now clear enough ? if still not clear then lets say there are a bunch of positive charges in one place and another bunch at a distance d but one bunch has lesser charges then the other lets say one has 10 and the other has 5 will there be a potential difference between them ? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:04
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If by magnitude difference you mean Plate A has a charge of +1 and plate B has a charge of +9, then there will be a potential difference. If by magnitude difference you mean Plate A has a charge of +1 and plate B has a charge of +1, then there won't be a potential difference.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am talking about the first condition you wrote about with +1 and +9 but will there really be a potential difference considering that the nature of the charge is the same i mean its not like one is negative and other is positive like electrons won't move from one side to the other ...both the plates have the same nature both are positive or both negative in this scenario the electron or any other charge won't move from one side to other side so how is that a potential difference ? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:12
  • $\begingroup$ Electrons will move from the +1 plate to the +9 plate till the charges of the plates are equal. Both plates are made of loads of protons and electrons who's charges usually cancel each other out. Removing some electrons does make a plate positively charged but it still has electrons. $\endgroup$ – Laff70 Feb 9 '16 at 17:18
  • $\begingroup$ But it won't make it all the way to +9 right ?? i mean its going to move from +1 to +9 till the force is equal from both sides and it will stop there right ??? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, the flow of electrons will stop once the charge of each plate is equal. $\endgroup$ – Laff70 Feb 9 '16 at 17:25
  • $\begingroup$ Then that means there isn't any potential difference right ?? because potential difference is "the difference in potential between two points that represents the work involved or the energy released in the transfer of a unit quantity of electricity from one point to the other" right ? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:30
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Yes. If you have two positively charged plates of different charge magnitudes and fire a stream of electrons between them, the electrons will deflect toward the "more positive" plate. Though really the electron stream isn't exactly necessary, since the two plates will repel each other indicating a potential difference right off the bat.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ok...agreed mostly i thought of that ,let me explain why i think that is wrong > what if we put a positive charge in between them then it will move towards the more positive plate and it will also be attracted by the less positive plate and it will be suspended some where right there(a little to the side from the middle close to the more positive plate) isn't that gonna happen in the case that you just talked about also ??? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:17
  • $\begingroup$ Like charges repel, not attract. The positively charged particle would move towards the less positively charged plate till it felt a repulsive force from each plate that was equal in magnitude. It would also probably get repelled out of the system entirely. $\endgroup$ – Laff70 Feb 9 '16 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ sorry I Kind of said that wrong but what about the electron ??? won't it experience what I said ?? like it will move a little and when it experiences same force from both sides then it will stop isn't that whats going to happen ?? $\endgroup$ – Bilal King Feb 9 '16 at 17:26
  • $\begingroup$ No. The electron would only stay in the same place when the attractive forces from each plate cancel each other out. That area is infinitesimally small and unlikely for the electron to ever get to and stay there. What would happen is the electron would be attracted to the +9 plate, accelerate towards it, and entering it. $\endgroup$ – Laff70 Feb 9 '16 at 17:33

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