1
$\begingroup$

When I think of an explosion it lasts a fraction of second. When the entire mass of the universe explodes, how much time passes before the perfect sphere slows down, from traveling at/near the speed of light from the forming of atoms? Or is the big bang still happening, but we are inside the sphere, while the shock wave still moves through space?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by CuriousOne, ACuriousMind, Danu, Gert, user36790 Jan 31 '16 at 14:51

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    $\begingroup$ It's not an explosion and the mass was never concentrated in one spot. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jan 30 '16 at 20:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne fixed? $\endgroup$ – Muze the good Troll. Jan 30 '16 at 21:11
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Just as bad as before. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jan 30 '16 at 21:12
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ See Did the Big Bang happen at a point?. There is no sphere, and there is no explosion. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Jan 30 '16 at 21:24
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ The answer to your first question can be answered regardless of your misunderstanding of Big Bang. The time passing before atoms begin to form is 379,000 years, which is the time it took for the temperature to drop sufficiently for atoms not to be constantly ionized. $\endgroup$ – pela Jan 30 '16 at 23:51
1
$\begingroup$

The answer to your first question can be answered regardless of your misunderstanding of Big Bang. The time passing before atoms begin to form is 379,000 years, which is the time it took for the temperature to drop sufficiently for atoms not to be constantly ionized.

pela, in a comment.

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ There are at least two problems with what you've done here. First, from a strict point of view you are in violation of the license agreement here. You haven't said where you got this nor from whom in a way that satisfies the license. Second it represents and attempt gain by simply coping another users contribution which is gauche to say the least. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Jan 31 '16 at 17:11
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @dmckee I'm am so tired of people using the comment box to answer. When someone answers in this way it is only fair that it gets adopted..I will refrain and delete if necessary. $\endgroup$ – Muze the good Troll. Feb 1 '16 at 21:23
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @dmckee the source is right at the end, "pela" $\endgroup$ – Mitchell Porter Feb 2 '16 at 11:57
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @MitchellPorter Thus "from a strict point of view" and "in a way that satisfies the license" which is a surprisingly high hurdle leading to the recent consideration of adopting a different license for code snippets (see also several following threads on the mother meta. What Jen has done is casual and more or less works as long as (a) the comment above is left and (b) this content isn't copied elsewhere. But neither of those things is guaranteed. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Feb 2 '16 at 16:01
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Jen I have re-formatted your post to comply with the license and our plagiarism guidelines. The licence requires the links to the post source and the user, but the more important part (which is more likely to be the source of the downvotes) is the plagiarism bit: you need to make it visually clear that you are quoting someone else. I feel you on the answers in comments, but we generally frown upon re-quotes like this unless you've prompted the user in the comments to re-post as an answer, and they've declined. And if you're doing this, don't strip links! $\endgroup$ – Emilio Pisanty Feb 6 '16 at 16:11

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.