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Does a formula (or a rule of thumb) exist to estimate the wind speed between a high pressure area and a low pressure area given the pressure difference between the two areas? Only the wind resulting from a pressure difference is of interest, additional influences like Coriolis force or centrifugal force can be neglected.

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    $\begingroup$ You might want to look up "Pitot Tube" $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jan 14 '16 at 12:39
  • $\begingroup$ Coriolis force is the controlling force of atmospheric dynamics outside of a short band around the equator. Outside of the tropics, it makes no sense to neglect the Coriolis force between low and high pressure areas in the atmosphere. $\endgroup$ – Vladimir F Jan 26 '16 at 23:08
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I have no direct experience with meteorology, but if you want the "rule of thumb", study the Euler equations. Specifically:

$$ \nabla p = - \rho\frac{\mathrm{D}\vec{v}}{\mathrm{D}t} $$

where D denotes the material derivative. That's the root of all other derivations.

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A rule of thumb exists if coriollis force is the dominant force balancing the pressure gradient. This is known as the geostrophic balance :

$$ \overrightarrow{V_g} = {\hat{k} \over f} \times \nabla_p \Phi $$

However if only a pressure gradient is being maintained by some source then the velocity will keep increasing as the pressure gradient results in accelerations as the previous user (@Victor noted). However in the real world the balance will eventually be between pressure and some parameterized viscosity :

$$ \nabla p = \nu_{eddy} \nabla ^2 v $$

Calculating $\nu_{eddy}$ is non trivial and really depends on case to case basis.

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